The Chronic Guide to Buying Food

Hi everyone,

So today I wanted to talk about where I get my food and how you can get good food too. We'll go over gluten-free foods but we'll look at healthy food and gastroparesis-friendly options too.

If you're not living in one of those areas where everything just seems available, you'll need this article. Who even lives in a place where you can just get food off of shelves and have it work for you? I don't!

So today I wanted to talk about where I get my food and how you can get good food too. We'll go over gluten-free foods but we'll look at healthy food and gastroparesis-friendly options too.  If you're not living in one of those areas where everything just seems available, you'll need this article. Who even lives in a place where you can just get food off of shelves and have it work for? I don't!

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Let's go over all the places you can go to find your food.

1. Supermarkets

This is probably the easiest option for a lot of people. You’ll find gluten-free products in the health foods aisle. It depends on the chain whether they’ll have more products rather than just the basics like bread and cookies.

It’s worth going round the isles and just having a look at everything that’s on offer. Sometimes there’s a gluten-free section in the freezer isle, too.

The best way to shop in a supermarket is to stay around the perimeter, that's where the healthiest food is. Overall, I'm not the biggest fan of supermarkets but it deserves a mention for ease of access, for sure.

2. Health food/farm stores

This is can be a scary option for people but it’s so worth it. You’ll be able to find a larger selection of gluten-free items and they sell good produce, too.

The people who work at the store will often be able to help you find items that are gluten-free and can help out with health food questions.

If there’s a farm store near you, it's definitely worth a visit. My local one sells their own organic produce and works with other local farms to supply vegetables and fruits they don’t grow.

Getting your vegetables straight from the field really helps with their nutritional content. it makes such a big difference in quality and helps with storing the produce you've bought.

The fruits and vegetables I get from them keep way longer than their supermarket versions. They often have different vegetables and fruits you won't find in the supermarket, most often at better prices too.

3. Online

Getting certain staples where I live can be hard. There are loads of different good quality brands but nothing much that's certified gluten-free. 

Recently, a supermarket opened near where I live that labels all their own-brand products so that’s great for things like jam etc…

What they don’t sell, or if they do sell it but their quality isn’t great, I buy online.

My favourite websites to buy groceries are vitacost.com and Iherb.com. They both ship across the globe at very affordable prices.

They sell things like Orgain, Justin's Nut butters, Bob's Red Mill products etc.. 

In terms of price, I always compare both and see which one's the best option. Don't forget to check shipping rates too, if you're in Europe, that does make a difference on the total cost.

On average I spend about $5-9 per order on shipping.

They don’t charge a fee to become a member and have discounts for your first order. They have free shipping over a certain order amount in the U.S.

The shipping options I use usually take 10 days to two weeks to arrive. If I ever have any problems with an order with them, they’ve always solved it straight away.

If you're in Europe, make sure to check what the import value limit is for your country to avoid having to pay import taxes. In general, it's €22 after discounts and before shipping.

Amazon.com sells groceries too, of course, but not living in the U.S., I haven’t been able to try them for their groceries yet. Either because what I needed isn’t shipped abroad or because it’s sold in bulk making it too expensive to ship.

Same goes for subscription/fee-based stores like TriveMarket. They’re only available inside the U.S. so I can’t personally say what using them has been like.

That's all for this article, if you're interested in reading more on these kinds of topics, let me know in the comments.

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ABOUT SARAH

Sarah is a certified health coach and trained pastry chef. She was diagnosed with gastroparesis almost 6 years ago. Since then she was diagnosed with gluten intolerance and dysautonomia. Her step by step systems help other spoonies combine going gluten-free with their other dietary restrictions, apply systems to use their spoons well and get support.