The Chronic Guide to Juicing V. Blending

Plus my FAVORITE gastroparesis-friendly green juice recipe

There have been several things I've started doing over the years that have helped so much they've become necessities for day-to-day living.

One of these is making green juice.

Difference between juicing and blending

There is a lot of info out there on juicing, but I wanted to give you my take on gp-friendly green juice and give you a quick overview of juicing and blending.

Lots of people seem to get confused when it comes to the difference between juicing and blending.

The confusion starts when people start looking at recipes and wonder what they can put in their machine.

Juicing

If you want juice, you'll need a juicer. There are several different ones out there but, for now, I'll assume you're getting a centrifugal juicer.

These are the most affordable and the easiest to use.

They have a chute at the top for the produce, a spinning sieve/grater and a bucket at the back of the machine to catch the pulp.

The sieve in the machine gets rid of the pulp/fiber, making it a good way to add lots of vegetables that are pretty darn hard to eat in any other way, shape or form with gastroparesis.

These machines can only handle fruits and vegetables so don't try and add peanut butter. To make green juice, you'll need green coloured veggies as the base. 

So, to sum things up, a green juice is a pulp free drink, based on green veggies (healthy!), made in a juicer. 

Blending

You'll need a blender to make smoothies. You can add anything to a blender that doesn't work in a juicer. 

Things like nut butters, oils, supplements, protein powders and fruits and vegetables you can't juice. Anything that's been cooked can't be juiced but can be added to a smoothie (like a sweet potato). Bananas can't be juiced either. 

If you've got gastroparesis or plan on blending often (every day), it's worth investing in a high-powered blender like a Vitamix or a Blendtec. 

My favorite gastroparesis-friendly juice recipe

I make this recipe once a week (saves spoons!) and freeze it in single serving containers.  It makes enough juice for 10 portions.

You'll probably have to play around a little to find a recipe that your stomach can cope with, but this one works great for me.

Gastroparesis-Friendly Green Juice

Stuff you'll need

  • juicer
  • a jug
  • bowls
  • a nut milk bag or muslin cloth*
  • a sieve*

Ingredients

  • 1-2 heads of lettuce
  • 1 pineapple (peeled and quartered)
  • 6-7 stalks of kale
  • 3/4 cucumber (peeled)

Feed through the juicer in the order listed. Depending on your juicer, you'll get a cup more juice if you put the pulp back through the machine.

Squeezing the leftover pulp through a nut milk bag gets about that extra as well.

If you don't have gastroparesis you don't need to do this.

If you do, you might want to go through these extra steps to get a tastier juice (bonus!) your stomach will be way better of with.

Get another (or the same) nut milk bag and a sieve. Pour your juice through the sieve into the nut milk bag (or a piece of muslin cloth) and let drain.

That's it! Congrats, you've made gp-friendly green juice! Now, dilute a bit and sit back, sip slowly and get some of those spoons back that making this probably cost you. Don't forget to enjoy!

*optional, for making gp-friendly juice

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ABOUT SARAH

Sarah is a certified health coach and trained pastry chef. She was diagnosed with gastroparesis almost 6 years ago. Since then she was diagnosed with gluten intolerance and dysautonomia. Her step by step systems help other spoonies combine going gluten-free with their other dietary restrictions, apply systems to use their spoons well and get support.